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Badenoch's barracks go 3D after three centuries


By Tom Ramage

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Introducing Ruthven Barracks as you’ve never seen it before.

There were no photographers around in 1719 when Andrew Jelfe built his famous/infamous Kingussie fort, but the Badenoch Great Place Project has made up for that by commissioning an augmented reality model.

Digital reconstruction of Ruthven Barracks (c1730) by Bob Marshall
Digital reconstruction of Ruthven Barracks (c1730) by Bob Marshall

Artist Bob Marshall told the Strathy: “It is a collaboration between myself, Eve Boyle of Historic Environment Scotland with some additional input from historians Geoffrey Stell and Simon Forder.

“It was commissioned by Badenoch Great Place Project and Cairngorms National Park Authority as one of a series of similar reconstructions of Badenoch heritage sites that I am currently working on for them.”

The barracks illustrations are derived from a digital 3D model which is intended for future use as an augmented reality app. The 3D fort took about three weeks to construct, said the historical reconstruction artist and modelmaker. He produces detailed architectural illustrations and historical reconstructions using digital techniques and computer models.

“I am not an architect, historian or archaeologist, although I am obviously very passionate about all three of these subjects. My work is usually a collaboration with historical consultants who are experts in their various fields. It’s a process I really enjoy and it gives me the chance to learn from some fascinating individuals.”

Most of the information came from the original plan drawings of Jelfe, the architect, said Mr Marshall.

Digital reconstruction of Ruthven Barracks (c1730) by Bob Marshall
Digital reconstruction of Ruthven Barracks (c1730) by Bob Marshall

The model has been unveiled to mark the Badenoch Great Place Project’s new website (www.badenochstorylands.com) which, project officer Caroline Sterritt explained, highlights Badenoch’s cultural heritage to visitors, businesses and residents.

“It’s a resource to learn more about our cultural heritage including intriguing historical sites, absorbing stories, music and Gaelic place names and much more besides,” she said.

The website contains links to the five Badenoch community websites and also helps keep up-to-date with the project.

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